Mason Author Series: Tropical Conservation with Dr. A. Alonso Aguirre

The University Libraries, Mason Publishing, and the University Bookstore, present
The Mason Author Series
in association with Fall for the Book

Tropical Conversation: Perspectives on Local and Global Priorities

Tropical Conservation with Dr. A. Alonso Aguirre

Monday September 26, 2016

3:00-4:15 pm

Main Reading Room (2nd floor), Fenwick Library, Fairfax Campus

In Tropical Conservation: Perspectives on Local and Global Priorities, editor A. Alonso Aguirre (Department Chair of Mason’s Environmental Science and Policy program) brings together experts who primarily work in Africa, Latin America and Asia to introduce important conservation concepts and real world applications to issues that affect the tropics and subtropics; a region with 75% of the world’s human population as well as 90% of its biodiversity.

Tropical Conservation argues that issues such as climate change, environmental sustainability, and emerging diseases must be studied and addressed on a global scale. Today, no part of the world can be viewed in isolation, and we further codify and integrate a range of approaches for addressing global threats to nature and environmental sustainability, including climate change and emerging diseases.

Aguirre will be joined by his contributors: Thomas Lovejoy who coined the term “biological diversity”; Larry Gorenflo, who focuses on how people adapt to their natural and cultural surroundings; Ingrid Visseren-Hamakers, whose research centers on international biodiversity governance; Harald Beck, who studies mammal-plant interaction and ecosystem engineering in temperate and tropical ecosystems; Andrew Taber, an environmental pioneer and authority on Neotropical wildlife; Elizabeth Loh, who studies anthropogenic land-use change; and wildlife biologist and veterinarian, Iga Stasiak.

Aguirre 5

Please join us for this event. The event is free and refreshments will be provided. The book will be available for purchase.

Open Scholarship Initiative (OSI) 2016 Conference Papers

This Word Cloud is comprised of the compiled text of all OSI2016 conference papers
Facts and figures associated with OSI2016
Poster of OSI “By the Numbers”

Mason Publishing has published the papers from the inaugural Open Scholarship Initiative (OSI) Conference, held in April 2016 at George Mason University, in collaboration with the National Science Communication Institute and UNESCO. OSI is a multi-year effort to establish a new, global framework in which a wide variety of stakeholders will be able to work together over the long term to shape and manage the future of scholarly publishing. The final papers and workgroup presentations can be found and downloaded at http://journals.gmu.edu/osi —all have been published under a Creative Commons license. Links to individual papers are below.

Of all the many conferences I have attended over the years—certainly more than a few hundred—OSI was the most diverse in terms of stakeholder representation from a variety of different fields and perspectives in scholarly publishing. OSI2016 convened high-level (CEO/Dean/Director) delegates from across the research and academic publishing sphere to chart the future of scholarly publishing and open access. In all, 196 delegates attended OSI2016, representing 12 countries and 15 stakeholder groups across 184 institutions, including 50 major research universities (25 percent of delegates), 37 scholarly publishers (19 percent of delegates), 24 government policy organizations (12 percent), 23 scholarly libraries and groups, 23 non-university research institutions, 17 open knowledge groups (9 percent), eight faculty and education groups, and more. Countries represented include the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Brazil, Mexico, Australia, Singapore, and South Africa.

OSI workgroup sessions and subsequent conference papers seek to answer broad, foundational questions: What do we mean by publishing? Who should decide what is and isn’t open? What are the moral implications for open and what are the usage dimensions? Other topics included the tensions between impact overload and underload; the status of preservation mandates and repositories; peer review systems and options for reform; and tracking the impact of research through impact factors and alternative metrics. The different ideas and perspectives the participants led to a wide range of ideas on how to improving the way that research is published, shared and accessed.

The What is Publishing (1) Workgroup (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13021/G8630H) looked at the evolving scholarly publishing ecosystem and determined that the needs of researchers are not being met by the current system. Instead, they recommend a change to disaggregated services—unbundling the products and services that publishers currently provide and letting market forces drive the development of, and demand for, a new and improved à la carte world of knowledge artifacts and knowledge management tools.

OSI2016's "What is Publishing 1" workgroup—at work
The “What is Publishing 1” workgroup—at work

Meanwhile, the What is Publishing (2) Workgroup (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13021/G8CS33) envisions a future publishing paradigm that is net­worked, open, and significantly more dynamic than the traditional model; their recommendations include identifying gaps in evidence and knowledge and working to define unmet publishing and dissemina­tion needs of scholars.

The What is Open? Workgroup (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13021/G8XK5R) found that the scholarly community’s current definition of “open” captures only some of the attributes of openness, which instead exist along a broad spectrum of attributes. Their framework proposes an alternative way of describing and evaluating openness based on four attributes—discoverable, accessible, reusable, and transparent—the “DART Framework for Open Access.”

Who decides the future of open access and who has the power to make decisions that can affect the future of open access? The Who Decides? Workgroup (DOI: http://doi.org/10.13021/G8P30V) examined stakeholders and their power as actors of change. Their report offers three possible change scenarios: in the way scholars are evaluated, the way some innovations in scholarly publishing can be nurtured, and the way cooperation can empower a “global flip” of existing research journals to open access.

The Moral Dimensions of Open Workgroup (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13021/G8SW2G) considered the moral foundations of knowledge production and access that underlie models of scholarly publishing. Their report identifies seven moral dimensions and principles to open-access scholarship and data, recognizing the moral responsibility to maximize the benefits of scholarly publishing for the larger society.

The Usage Dimensions of Open Workgroup (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13021/G8FK5D) identified definitions, priorities, and themes, including the character of research outputs and the actual research workflow process, as well as economic considerations.

Delegates from the OSI2016 Usage Dimensions Workgroup
OSI2016 Usage Dimensions Workgroup

Two groups examined how scholarly publishing tools and products are evolving. The Evolving Open Solutions (1) Workgroup (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13021/G8VS3F) considered barriers to openness, such as flawed incentives, and how these barriers can be overcome. Their recommendations included defining an ideal future and an alter­native system for funding, tenure, and promotion.

The Evolving Open Solutions (2) Workgroup (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13021/G8ZK52) assessed the most significant challenges confronting academic publishing over the next 3-5 years and proposed recommendations centered on themes of culture change, funding/sustainability, and the unique infrastructural requirements for different disciplines and diverse forms of research output.

The Open Impacts Workgroup (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13021/G8488N) identified three areas for a new framework for understanding the impact of open: measuring openness, utilization measures, and understanding economic impacts of open.

The Participation in the Current System Workgroup (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13021/G82C7P) focused on authors, who play a critical role in the scholarly communications system as the original content creators, are in many or most cases the original rightsholders, and are generally the ultimate decisionmakers when it comes to how, when, and where to publish their work. Envisioning a “perfect world” for authors, the group made recommendations for reforms, messaging, and research that could address many common author concerns and create a more hospitable framework for authors to participate in the open publishing system.

The Information Overload & Underload Workgroup (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13021/G8R30G) discussed access as a core aspect of the issue of overload and underload—both access to research materials and access to venues where one can contribute to the scholarly corpus. The group explored factors and causes of information overload and underload, and developed ideas for social and technology solutions addressing these issues.

The Repositories & Preservation Workgroup (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13021/G89W24) found that while repositories are a vital tool in modern information management and a key component of preser­vation and long-term availability, they are not well-suited to the multitude of stakeholders in the modern scholarly publishing system. Among their recommendations for strengthening repositories and standardizing preserva­tion processes are building new workflows and an ecosystem that will better ensure long-term access and preservation.

The Peer Review Workgroup (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13021/G8K88P) focused on peer review in the context of open scholar­ship and found that while greater openness and transparency would improve accounta­bility, minimize bias, and encourage collaboration, there are significant challenges as well as a great variation in readiness across disciplines and publishing mod­els. The group recommended facilitation of peer review outside the traditional publication process—for example, in the context of preprint servers and after publication—with incen­tives for broad participation.

The Embargoes Workgroup (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13021/G8S014) categorized publication embargoes into four main types and focused on two: post-publication and subscription embargoes. Their recommendations include creating an evidence base for embargoes by funding a global survey of key stakeholders. They propose questions for the survey that would provide meaningful data about the is­sues surrounding embargoes.

The Impact Factors Workgroup (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13021/G88304) focused on the uses and misuses of the Journal Impact Factor (JIF), with a partic­ular focus on research assessment. The group’s recommendations include active support for the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA) by research funders, higher education institutions, national academies, publishers and learned societies as well as the creation of an international “metrics lab” to ex­plore the potential of new indicators and the wide sharing of information on this topic among stakeholders.

Finally, the At-Large Workgroup (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13021/G80K5C), of which I was a member, was the largest and most diverse in terms of stakeholder representa­tion, observing workgroup conversations during the meeting and used their wide-angle lens on the evolution of these questions and proceedings in order to develop some high-level takeaways on the OSI conference. These included observations on the format and process of the conference, the widespread theme of changing scholarly needs and outputs, the primacy of promotion and tenure in discussions on change in scholarly publishing, stakeholders and missing voices at OSI, the influence of impact, and recommendations going forward toward OSI 2017 and beyond.

This Word Cloud is comprised of the compiled text of all OSI2016 conference papers
Word Cloud of compiled text of OSI2016 conference paper

The At-Large paper discusses some of the common themes found throughout the workgroup sessions and papers. This word cloud—created from the compiled texts of all sixteen conference papers—also highlights the most frequent terms and themes discussed at OSI2016.

If you are interested in attending OSI2017, to be held in April 2017 at George Washington University, email mailto:osi2016@nationalscience.org or visit our contact page at: http://osinitiative.org/contact/ 

OER Part 5: Articles and Research

The following Open Educational Resources (OER) collection includes scholarly articles and other research on the benefits, uses, development, and adaptation of OER. Given the rapid growth of the OER movement, both in terms of the academic credibility and attention of policy makers it has gained, it is important for us to monitor the OER landscape as it continues to evolve. To learn more about open educational resources in higher education and how you can get involved in the OER movement, check out the rest of the series:

Part 1: Course Content and Textbooks | Part 2: Open Courses and MOOCs | Part 3: Grants and Advocacy | Part 4: K-12 ResourcesContinue Reading OER Part 5: Articles and Research

Seeking a digital content designer

Mason Publishing/George Mason University Press is hiring! We’re looking for an experienced and talented digital content designer with experience in graphic design and digital publishing tools.

Mason Publishing, a department of the University Libraries, invites applicants for a Digital Content Designer responsible for the development of digital and print publications and support for digital publishing tools and platforms. Mason Publishing is an initiative that unites the George Mason University Library’s existing digital publishing activity with the George Mason University Press to form a set of publishing services for the university. George Mason University has a strong institutional commitment to the achievement of excellence and diversity among its faculty and staff. Women, minorities, individuals with disabilities and veterans are encouraged to apply.

Responsibilities:
Reporting to the Digital Publishing Production Lead, the Digital Content Designer develops compelling textual and visual solutions across a variety of formats and digital platforms (e.g., print, e-books, mobile and Web).

Required Qualifications:

  • Outstanding typographical and design skills;
  • Experience in graphic design, publishing production or digital publishing (two to four years is preferred);
  • Proficiency with one or more of the following: Adobe Creative Suite (CS6) and/or Adobe Creative Cloud, including Illustrator, InDesign and Photoshop;
  • Proficiency in one or more of the following: HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript;
  • Experience managing events and organizing meetings;
  • Ability to work collaboratively with outside vendors and the in-house production team;
  • Ability to work within tight deadlines without sacrificing quality;
  • Experience preparing digital assets for production and printing;
  • Be a self-starter, detail-oriented, and willing to conform to in-house design standards; and
  • Complete design tasks and implement visual identity across Mason Publishing products.

Preferred Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s degree in graphic design, communication arts, fine arts, a closely related field, or an equivalent combination of education and experience;
  • Develop print or digital publications such as monographs, short content, textbooks and other material using outside vendors or internal expertise;
  • Ability to work with in-house staff to style a variety of Web-based content systems;
  • Ability to work with clients to style Web-based e-journals and advise journal producers on design and production issues;
  • Knowledge of ePUB3 specifications, XML, and derivative or related formats; and
  • In-depth knowledge and expertise in the following: Adobe Creative Suite (CS6) and/or Adobe Creative Cloud, including Illustrator, InDesign and Photoshop; HTML; HTML5; CSS3; and JavaScript.

For full consideration, applicants must apply for position number 00494z at http://jobs.gmu.edu by May 2, 2016; complete and submit the online application; and upload a cover letter, resume, and a list of three professional references with contact information.

George is ready to celebrate launch of “The Five George Masons”

FiveGeorges_01On Wednesday, April 6th, at 3:00 p.m., we’ll be celebrating the book launch of The Five George Masons: Patriots and Planters of Virginia and Maryland. In preparation, George (the statue) has decked himself in Mason Pride colors—and you can also see that he’s proud of the new book.

University Professor Rosemarie Zagarri will be guest speaker at the book launch. The book, by Pamela C. Copeland and Richard K. MacMaster, was recently published in a new, second edition by the George Mason University Press. The book launch will be held in the Fenwick Library Main Reading Room.

May 6, 2016 will mark the 240th anniversary of the Virginia Declaration of Rights, written by George Mason, a document that has left an indelible mark on democracy as we know it today. In the Virginia Declaration of Rights and his efforts revising the laws of Virginia, George Mason made lasting contributions to the American tradition of individual liberty and limited government. His draft of the Virginia Declaration of Rights began “That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights…namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the FiveGeorges_02means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.” These words inspired Thomas Jefferson when he wrote the United States Declaration of Independence, and likewise inspired the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of the French Revolution, one of the founding documents in the human rights tradition.

Dr. Zagarri will speak about “George Mason in History and Memory” as part of the Mason Author Series, sponsored by the University Libraries and the University Bookstore. The Mason Author Series highlights significant publications of George Mason University faculty and alumni.

First published in 1975, the second edition of The Five George Masons has been published in collaboration with the Board of Regents of Gunston Hall, and features an introductory note by George Mason University President Ángel Cabrera; a foreword by Scott Stroh, Executive Director of Gunston Hall; and new images and maps.

The event is free and open to the public. No registration is required. We hope you can join us!

 

Rosemarie Zagarri to speak at launch of “The Five George Masons”

Cover of The Five George Masons, featuring a portrait of George Mason IV.University Professor Rosemarie Zagarri will be guest speaker at the book launch of The Five George Masons: Patriots and Planters of Virginia and Maryland, by Pamela C. Copeland and Richard K. MacMaster, recently published in a new, second edition by the George Mason University Press. The event will be held on Wednesday, April 6th, at 3:00 p.m. in the Fenwick Library Main Reading Room.

Dr. Zagarri will speak about “George Mason in History and Memory” as part of the Mason Author Series, sponsored by the University Libraries and the University Bookstore. The Mason Author Series highlights significant publications of George Mason University faculty and alumni.

Dr. Rosemarie Zagarri
The alt text for this image is the same as the title. In most cases, that means that the alt attribute has been automatically provided from the image file name. Dr. Rosemarie Zagarri

Rosemarie Zagarri received her Ph.D. from Yale University and is currently University Professor and Professor of History at George Mason University. She is the author of several books, has published numerous articles in scholarly journals, and received a number of national fellowships and awards. In 2009, she was elected President of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic (SHEAR), the national organization for early Americanists.

First published in 1975, the second edition of The Five George Masons has been published in collaboration with the Board of Regents of Gunston Hall, and features an introductory note by George Mason University President Ángel Cabrera; a foreword by Scott Stroh, Executive Director of Gunston Hall; and new images and maps.

The event is free and open to the public. No registration is required.

For more information, contact: John Warren, Head, Mason Publishing/George Mason University Press, University Libraries, George Mason University
Office: 703-993-3636 • Email: jwarre13@gmu.edu

Mason Author Series with University Professor Giorgio A. Ascoli on March 29th

University Professor Giorgio A. AscoliMason Publishing, the George Mason University Libraries, and the University Bookstore present Mason University Professor Giorgio A. Ascoli, discussing his book Trees of the Brain, Roots of the Mind, in the kickoff of the Mason Author Series. This inaugural event of the series, which is sponsored by the George Mason University Bookstore, will be held in the Fenwick Library Main Reading Room, on Tuesday, March 29th, at 2:30 p.m.

Trees of the Brain, Roots of the MindIn Trees of the Brain, Roots of the Mind, Dr. Ascoli offers a new perspective on the roots of individuality and humanity, discusses how the brain learns from experience, and unveils a radically new hypothesis of the mechanism for determining what is learned, what isn’t, and why. Doing so, he makes a provocative claim about the mind-brain relationship. The book, published by MIT Press, reveals another aspect of the human brain: the stunning beauty of its cellular form, which includes tens of billions of nerve cells—tiny tree-like structures—comprising a massive network with enormous computational power.

Dr. Ascoli is University Professor in the Molecular Neuroscience Department and founding Director of the Center for Neural Informatics, Structure, and Plasticity at the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study at George Mason University.

The Mason Author Series will highlight significant publications of George Mason University faculty and alumni. The Mason Author series event is part of the grand opening festivities for the new Fenwick Library building, which opened in January 2016.

The second event in the series will celebrate the launch of the new edition of The Five George Masons, recently published by the George Mason University Press. Dr. Rosemarie Zagarri, University Professor and Professor of History at Mason, will be speaking about “George Mason in History and Memory.” This event will also take place in in Fenwick Library’s Reading Room, on April 6, 2016, at 3 p.m.

The event is free and open to the public. No registration is required.

For more information, contact: John Warren, Head, Mason Publishing/George Mason University Press, University Libraries, George Mason University

Office: 703-993-3636 • Email: jwarre13@gmu.edu

George Mason University Press Releases Book on George Mason

The George Mason University Press, a department of the University Libraries, has released a new edition of The Five George Masons: Patriots and Planters of Virginia and Maryland by Pamela C. Copeland and Richard K. MacMaster. First published in 1975, the second edition was published in collaboration with the Board of Regents of Gunston Hall, George Mason’s ancestral home. The new edition features an introductory note by George Mason University President Ángel Cabrera; a foreword by Scott Stroh, Executive Director of Gunston Hall; and new images and maps.

“It is under theCover of The Five George Masons, featuring a portrait of George Mason IV. enduring spirit of George Mason’s legacy of freedom and learning that we instill an innovative and entrepreneurial attitude and a culture of diversity and accessibility—which we call the Mason IDEA—here at George Mason University,” writes Cabrera in his introductory note. “And it is in this spirit that we are honored to publish this new edition of The Five George Masons.”

Though often less celebrated than fellow Virginians George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison, George Mason’s work as the author of the Virginia Declaration of Rights left an indelible mark on democracy, as we know it today. The Five George Masons highlights his history and legacy as one of America’s outstanding thinkers, legislators and writers. This book, available through and the George Mason University bookstore, Amazon, and all major booksellers,  will serve as a valuable resource for researchers, historians, and those interested in the early history of America.

“This effort represents an important renewal of Gunston Hall’s partnership with George Mason University, “ writes Stroh in the foreword. “As educational organizations of the Commonwealth of Virginia, Gunston Hall and the University share many common goals. Specifically, we are both dedicated to a belief in the value of a high quality educational experience, to the importance of facilitated discourse as a fundamental aspect of learning, and to the premise that an education should be both physically and intellectually accessible and available to everyone. We also share a belief in an educational philosophy based on scholarship and authenticity, and a philosophy that includes personal exploration, discovery, and reflection. Finally, by virtue of our collective namesake, we proudly share a common dedication to the ideals and legacy represented by George Mason.”

The launch of the new edition of The Five George Masons will be celebrated in an event in Fenwick Library’s Reading Room, on April 6, 2016, at 3 p.m. Dr. Rosemarie Zagarri, University Professor and Professor of History at Mason, will be speaking about “George Mason in History and Memory.” This event is open to the public; no RSVP is required.

The George Mason University Press supports the academic mission of George Mason University by publishing peer-reviewed, scholarly works of distinction, written by authors from a wide range of intellectual perspectives, for a diverse, worldwide readership. The Press publishes in a variety of disciplines with special focus on the history, politics, and culture of Northern Virginia and the wider District of Columbia metropolitan area, as well as other topics such as public policy, international affairs, and higher education.

Faculty Support to Explore Open Ed Resources

How can you, as an educator, have increased control over your teaching materials, be more creative in the classroom, AND lower student costs? Use existing open educational resources (OER) or create your own materials!

Mason 4-VA, in collaboration with the University Libraries and Mason Online, invites you to submit a proposal for innovative redesign of a course that integrates digital (and accessible) materials. That is, you supplant expensive textbooks either with digital works that you create, or with existing digital content that is in the public domain, licensed Creative Commons, or available in databases to which the University Libraries subscribes. To that end, you are reducing the cost of instruction to students and improving learning outcomes.

Courses of particular interest are those that:

  • have high enrollment,
  • are required for majors,
  • count in the Mason Core, or
  • carry high textbook costs.

This initiative is a Mason 4-VA pilot project. Any Mason full-time instructional faculty who teach high demand, heavily populated courses are eligible to apply, as are adjunct faculty who are part of a team proposal.

Depending on the nature of the proposed project and the level of team collaboration, you may receive a competitive grant ranging from $1,500 to $5,000. Funds will be distributed in Summer 2016.

Library faculty are poised to assist you with locating quality OER content, as well as answering questions related to copyright and Creative Commons licensing of your own materials. Mason Publishing Group, a department of the University Libraries, is available to aid faculty in developing OER textbooks or workbooks as a part of this pilot project. Let us know how we may help you! Contact your subject librarian, Claudia Holland (chollan3@gmu.edu), or John Warren (jwarre13@gmu.edu), Head, Mason Publishing.

For more information and cover sheet, see: Course Redesign: Using Open Educational Resources

Proposals due: March 18, 2016 EXTENDED to March 21, 2016!

Award notification: April 4, 2016

Submit your proposal electronically to:

Linda Sheridan,

Deputy Coordinator, Mason 4-VA

lsherid1@gmu.edu

 

A New Year, New Offices

Temporary Mason Publishing Sign for Office 4318

The much anticipated move has occurred! After a busy January and early February, Mason Publishing has settled into our spaces in the new Fenwick Library.

View into Mason Publishing Office, showing chairs and reception desk.On January 19, the new Fenwick library opened to faculty, staff, and students, expanding the space available for study and collaboration within the library. The new space has made it possible for the various offices of Mason Publishing to reorganize in order to better serve the needs of the Mason community.

The offices of Claudia Holland, Head of Scholarly Communication and Copyright, John Warren, Head of Mason Publishing and the George Mason University Press, Caroline Strunk, Copyright Resources Assistant, and Jeri Wieringa, Digital Publishing Production Lead, are now located in the new Mason Publishing Office, suite #4318, on the 4th floor of the new building. Sally Evans, Coordinator of University Dissertation and Thesis Services, is now located in office #2005, next to the Special Collections Research Center and easily accessible from the Research Commons on the 2nd floor of the new building.

From these new office spaces, Mason Publishing is coordinating our efforts to support the innovative scholarly work produced by the Mason community. Come visit Mason Publishing and discover the many ways we can help you produce, distribute, and preserve your scholarly work.